Effects of Heat on the Body


Thermal imaging captures the BEFORE temperature of a Cool Canuck T-Shirt at approximately 30°C (86°F). The image underneath is taken AFTER a 35 minute workout with garment saturation. Note the temperatures have dropped by approximately 10°C (18°F), a difference of 30%.

Dehydration impairs both the physical and mental performance in all types and levels of sport. Prevention of overheating occurs with the cooling effect created by the evaporation of sweat. Although sweat rates are highest under conditions of high-intensity exercise in heat and humidity, total fluid losses can be appreciable in very prolonged events, whatever the conditions. These fluid losses must be replaced.

Sweating causes progressive depletion of circulating blood volume, leading to hypohydration (commonly called dehydration) and a thickening of blood. This places a strain on the cardiovascular system, with a rise in heart rate in order to maintain adequate blood flow to exercising muscles and vital organs. As blood volume depletes, blood flow to the skin is reduced. As a result, sweating decreases and heat dissipation from the skin is impaired, causing body core temperature to rise, potentially leading to heat stress, collapse and even death.

Even low levels of dehydration have physiological consequences. A loss of 2% body weight causes an increase in perceived effort and is claimed to reduce performance by 10-20% A fluid loss exceeding 3-5% bodyweight reduces aerobic exercise performance noticeably and impairs reaction time, judgment, concentration and decision making – vital elements in all sports.

Heat stress can occur in hot, humid environments. The locations may be indoors or outdoors. Heat stress causes the body’s core temperature to rise. A series of disorders can develop, ranging from discomfort and pain (heat rash and heat cramps) to life-threatening conditions (heat exhaustion and heat stroke).

The human body functions best within a narrow range of internal temperature. This core temperature varies from 36°C to 38°C. To get rid of excess heat, the body uses two cooling mechanisms:

  1. The heart rate increases to move blood — and heat — from heart, lungs, and other vital organs to the skin.
  2. Sweating increases to help cool blood and body. Sweating is the most important way the body gets rid of excess heat.

When too much sweat is lost through heavy labour or working under hot, humid conditions, the body doesn’t have enough water left to cool itself. The result is dehydration. Core temperature rises above 38°C. A series of heat-related illnesses, or heat stress disorders, can then develop.

Our apparel is designed to keep the user cool which reduces the amount of sweat required to dissipate the body’s’ excessive heat. By doing so, the body is able to hang onto more of its fluids, resulting in better overall performance.

About Cool Canuck

Our fabric is designed to keep the user cool which reduces the amount of sweat required to dissipate the excessive heat from your body. By doing so, your body is able to hang onto more of its fluids, resulting in better overall performance.

Contact Us

1-855-822-COOL (2665)
info@coolcanuck.com

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